D.H. Lawrence: The “Invisible Beauty” of the landscape

         In D.H Lawrence’s prose (Kangaroo, in 1923), he was vividly describing what he had seen and experienced in the Australian landscape on his train ride through Sydney. D. H Lawrence is known for the connotations and contrasts in his writings making it quite challenging to grasp, hence our understanding of his prose will depend on how we contextualize what he’s trying to characterize. In his prose he was giving his point of view to the Australian landscape as having an “invisible beauty”.

          In my own understanding, the “Invisible Beauty” in D.H. Lawrence prose means the indescribable beauty of the landscape. It is fresh, vibrant, natural and untouched. Its beauty may not be seen by our naked eyes, but you can sense and feel its infinite abundance and richness. There is this mystical charm that draws anyone’s attention to its hidden qualities. D.H. Lawrence is an English writer who spent most of his life in England, thus he could be a little bit biased in giving his observation. However, he still tried to be truthful in expressing his point of view by describing the landscape as having an “invisible beauty”. He may not have seen anything like England but he had sensed its uniqueness and felt this different aura which gives a refreshing and welcoming feeling to the Australian landscape.

2 thoughts on “D.H. Lawrence: The “Invisible Beauty” of the landscape

  1. Aside from a few grammatical issues that need fixing Honeylene this is a beautiful response to Lawrence’s idea of “Invisible Beauty”. I liked especially your comment ” In my own understanding, the “Invisible Beauty” in D.H. Lawrence prose means the indescribable beauty of the landscape.” That captures exactly what he is saying.

    Editing Needed (and some workshop follow-ups- see Purdue Owl for help: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/1/
    * In D.H Lawrence prose = In D.H Lawrence’s prose [ the “prose” BELONGS to D.H. Lawrence. Wherever there is “belonging” you must use an ‘s. See: ‘s or s’ – Apostrophe- if there is a meaning of ownership ( the boy’s apple/ the boys’ apples) then you need an apostrophe. See http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/621/01/. But don’t use apostrophe s for normal plurals!!! ]
    *Lawrence is known for his connotations and contrast= Lawrence is known for THE connotations and contrastS
    *hence our understanding to his prose= hence our understanding OF his prose
    *what he’s trying to characterized.= what he’s trying to characterize.
    *may not be seen in our naked eyes= may not be seen BY our naked eyes
    *He may not had seen anything like England= He may not HAVE seen anything like England
    *but he had sense its uniqueness = but he SENSED its uniqueness
    *gives a refreshing and welcoming feeling in the Australian landscape.= gives a refreshing and welcoming feeling TO the Australian landscape.

    Liked by 1 person

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